The Dangers of E-Cigarettes and Vaping

Man blowing smoke from a vape pen
Image Source: Rubén Bagüés/Unsplash

As of November 20, 2019, 2,290 cases of e-cigarette or vaping product use associated lung injury (EVALI) have been reported to CDC from 49 states. CDC continues to work closely with FDA, states, public health partners, and clinicians on this investigation. While the CDC is still looking into other chemicals of concern to EVALI, CDC recommends that people should not use THC-containing e-cigarette or vaping products, particularly from informal sources like friends, or family, or in-person or online dealers. While this investigation is ongoing, vitamin E acetate should not be added to e-cigarette or vaping products.

What are E-Cigarettes/Vaping products?

  • E-cigarettes work by heating a liquid to produce an aerosol that users inhale into their lungs.
  • The liquid can contain: nicotine, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabinoid (CBD) oils, and other substances and additives. THC is the psychoactive mind-altering compound of marijuana that produces the “high”.
  • E-cigarettes are not safe for youth, young adults, pregnant women, or adults who do not currently use tobacco products.
  • While e-cigarettes have the potential to benefit some people and harm others, scientists still have a lot to learn about whether e-cigarettes are effective for quitting smoking. 1

What is the CDC Recommending?2

  • Do not use THC-containing e-cigarette or vaping products.
  • Do not modify or add any substances to e-cigarette or vaping products that are not intended by the manufacturer, including products purchased through retail establishments.
  • Adults using e-cigarettes to quit smoking should not go back to smoking; they should weigh all risks and benefits and consider utilizing FDA-approved nicotine replacement therapies
  • Adults who continue to use an e-cigarette or vaping product, should carefully monitor themselves for symptoms and see a healthcare provider immediately if they develop symptoms like those reported in this outbreak.

Tria Health and Tobacco Cessation

For employers that offer Tria Health’s Tobacco Cessation Program, Tria provides free confidential counseling with a clinical pharmacist. If you ready to quit smoking, Tria Health’s pharmacist will assist you in managing your medications and finding a treatment plan that works for you.

Have any questions?

Contact the Tria Health Help Desk: 1.888.799.8742

Sources:

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/index.htm
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/severe-lung-disease.html

Diabetic-Friendly Halloween Treats

Image Source: Mel Poole/Unsplash

As Halloween approaches, it can be stressful as a diabetic, to be surrounded by so many sweets and treats. While it’s true that you won’t be able to snack on a whole bowl of candy, there are still many recipes that can be enjoyed in moderation. To help you get through this spooky season, we’ve compiled a list of our favorite diabetic-friendly recipes:

Spiced Pumpkin Chip Cookies

Sugar-Free Gummy Worms

Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

Have any questions for us?

Contact the Tria Health Help Desk at 1.888.799.8742

National Pharmacists Month

Image Source: mohamed_hassan/pixabay

Happy National Pharmacists Month! The goal of this month is to recognize pharmacists for the significant role they play in effective medication management, patient education and overall medication safety. Learn more about how pharmacists can help you every day.

Safe and Effective Medication Use

Pharmacists help ensure that medications control conditions the right way. They help minimize any side effects and safeguard against any possible interactions with other medications that lead to more expensive health care costs such as emergency room visits, hospitalization, etc.

Preventative Services

Did you know that more than 300,000 immunization-trained pharmacists administer vaccines, and nearly one in four adults receive their influenza vaccinations at their community pharmacy?1 Pharmacists can provide guidance on all vaccine-preventable diseases and which immunizations are best for you.

OTCs and Supplements

Pharmacists are experts in prescription medications, supplements and over the counter medications. They can tell you about potential interactions with foods, other drugs, or dietary supplements. And they can help you pick the perfect product. With over 100,000 over-the-counter products on the market, your pharmacist is always there to lend a helping hand!1

Condition Management

Did you know that pharmacists are experts and more than just medications?  They are trained and educated in how to manage conditions as a whole. Tria Health has pharmacists who are certified diabetic educators on staff.  This allows them to treat the person rather than the medication.  They focus on non-pharmacy and pharmacy strategies to accomplish control of a disease.

Tria Health’s Pharmacists

Tria Health was founded on the belief that pharmacists play a vital role in the management of high-risk patients that drive the majority of health care spend. If Tria Health is currently a part of your healthcare plan, call the Tria Health Help desk today for any of your medication-related questions.

Tria Help Desk: 1.888.799.8742

Source: http://67.222.18.91/~aphm/pharmacists-can-help/

Meal Planning 101

Three container meals
Image Source: Ella Olsson/Unsplash

Is your schedule busier than usual with your kids going back to school? Are you struggling to prepare healthy meals because it feels like there’s not enough time in the day? Meal planning can help! Meal planning can help you from struggling to figure out what to cook every night along with helping you save money. You’ll also be more likely to eat out less and improve the health of both you and your family.

How to Choose your Recipes1

The most important aspect of meal planning is picking the recipes and getting everything prepped. Before you get started, be sure to consider:

  • Your Schedule: Are you planning for lunch or dinner? If dinner, how many nights will you want to make at home? You’ll need to know a general idea of how many meals you’ll want to prepare.
  • Cooking Recipes You Know: You’re much more likely to cook and eat recipes you’re familiar with. Start with building the habit and then work towards adding a new recipe or two each week.
  • Pick Recipes Based on Common Ingredients: Avoid wasted food and save money by reducing the number of ingredients you’ll need for your meals.

Get your Portions Right2

Creating healthy meals starts at the plate. That’s why the food pyramid has been replaced with a plate. As you see, half of your plate should be fruits and vegetables, preferably nonstarchy vegetables. Good choices include spinach, carrots, lettuce, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, tomatoes, cucumbers, beets and peppers. Grains fill another section. Choose brown rice, whole-wheat pasta or whole-wheat tortillas. Protein completes the plate. Healthy options include chicken or turkey without the skin, fish and other seafood, beans, soy, and lean cuts of beef and pork. Round out your meal with an 8-ounce glass of fat-free milk.

Questions?

Call the Tria Health Help Desk at 1.888.799.8742

Sources:

  1. https://www.thekitchn.com/the-beginners-guide-to-meal-planning-what-to-know-how-to-succeed-and-what-to-skip-242413
  2. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/multimedia/healthy-meals/sls-20076445?s=5

Zantac (ranitidine) Recall

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is alerting health care professionals and patients to a voluntary recall of over-the-counter (OTC) ranitidine tablets (75 mg and 150 mg), labeled by Walgreens, Walmart, and Rite-Aid and manufactured by Apotex Corp. This medication is being recalled due to low levels of a nitrosamine impurity. The agency encourages patients and health care professionals to report any adverse reaction to the FDA’s MedWatch program.

Why is it being recalled?

NDMA is classified as a probable human carcinogen (a substance that could cause cancer) based on results from laboratory tests. NDMA is a known environmental contaminant and found in water and foods, including meats, dairy products and vegetables.

What products are recalled?

The affected Ranitidine Hydrochloride Capsule can be identified by NDC numbers stated on the product label. The affected Sandoz Ranitidine includes 30 count, 60 count and 500 count bottles in the following lots. The product can be identified by the NDC number and lot number provided above. Sandoz Ranitidine Hydrochloride Capsules were distributed nationwide to wholesalers.

Patient Information

  • FDA is not recommending individuals stop taking all ranitidine medicines at this time.
  • Consumers taking OTC ranitidine could consider using other OTC products approved for their condition.
  • Patients taking prescription ranitidine who wish to discontinue use should talk to their health care professional about other treatment options. Multiple drugs are approved for the same or similar uses as ranitidine.

Need help?

Contact your Tria Health pharmacist today for additional assistance with the recall process: 1.888.799.8742

Sources:

  1. https://www.fda.gov/drugs/drug-safety-and-availability/fda-updates-and-press-announcements-ndma-zantac-ranitidine
  2. https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/sandoz-inc-issues-voluntary-recall-ranitidine-hydrochloride-capsules-150mg-and-300mg-due-elevate