National Drug Take Back Day is 4/28!

Close up of assorted pills and prescriptions
Image Source: iStock.com/klenova

Disposing of medications safely can help protect your family from getting or using medications that are expired or out of date; prevent the illegal use of unused medications and minimize any potential negative impact on the environment. For this reason, the DEA is giving the public an opportunity to dispose of unwanted and/or expired prescription drugs. This is a FREE and anonymous service—take medications back, no questions asked!

Where do I go?

Visit the DEA’s website to find a collection site:

https://apps.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/pubdispsearch/spring/main?execution=e1s1

Why can’t I throw out my medications at home?

Unfortunately, there are a lot of harmful myths floating around regarding medication disposal. Many people will try to flush their medications down the toilet or crush their medicines before throwing them in the trash. Flushing can end up polluting our waters and crushing medicines can put trash handlers at risk of exposure if the drug were to encounter their skin or if they were to breathe in the dust. Medicine take back programs are the best way to dispose of unwanted medicine.

 How can Tria Health Help?

As a member of Tria Health, if you have multiple medications and are afraid you’ll throw away the wrong medication, we can provide additional assistance in selecting the proper medications. Tria provides one-on-one consultations with a clinical pharmacist who assists you with your medication management.

 Questions?

Call the Tria Health Help Desk at 1.888.799.8742

 

Roseanne and the Reality of Medication Costs

Roseanne & Dan Trade Their Medicine
Video Source: Celeb Interview | Roseanne Episode 10×01 Roseanne & Dan Trade Their Medicine || Roseanne Scenes

In the revival premiere, Roseanne and Dan struggle to afford their medications and opt to split to get by. This issue is likely occurring in many households today due to the ever-increasing prices of prescription medications. According to the CDC, nearly 1 in 10 adults skip medications due to costs.1 This isn’t surprising when you learn that deductible spending has risen 250% while copayments have declined 36%.2

What Can You Do to Save Money on Medications?

The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services suggests the following ways patients can save money on drugs:

  • Take generic or other lower-cost medications,
  • Choose an insurance plan that has additional drug coverage,
  • Consider drug assistance plans offered by pharmacies and states,
  • Apply to Medicare and Social Security for help reducing costs,
  • Apply to community-based charities for help with medication costs.

How does Tria Help with Medication Savings?

If you take multiple medications and have a chronic condition, Tria Health provides private telephonic consultations with a pharmacist. Your Tria Health pharmacist will help identify clinically effective and lower cost medications. Members have on average saved up to $210 per year by switching medications.

Questions?

Contact the Tria Health Help Desk at 1.888.799.8742

 

SOURCES:

  1. Robin Cohen, Ph.D.; health statistician; Maria Villarroel, Ph.D., chief, special projects branch, both National Center for Health Statistics, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; David Katz, M.D., M.P.H., director, Yale University Prevention Research Center, New Haven, Conn.; Jan. 29, 2015, report, Strategies Used by Adults to Reduce Their Prescription Drug Costs: United States, 2013
  2. Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database, 2005-2015

The Cost of Non-Optimized Medications

Money within a Pill Bottle_iStock.com/slobo
Image source: iStock.com/slobo

Did you know, if the drugs you’re taking are wrong, skipped, or make you sick, there’s the possibility of incurring additional cost? A recent study published by The University of California – San Diego estimated that the current cost of each possible consequence and estimated total annual cost of illnesses and deaths that result from non-optimized medication therapy to be $528.4 billion. They estimated that the average cost of an individual experiencing treatment failure, a new medical problem or both after initial prescription use to be approximately $2,500.

How do Non-Optimized Medications lead to additional cost?

Here’s an example of non-optimized medications: You are diagnosed with asthma and your doctor prescribes you with a rescue inhaler. When you go to fill your prescription, you discover that the copay is too expensive for your budget and you choose not to purchase it. You later suffer from an asthma attack and must go to the hospital. You’re now stuck with a very expensive medical bill.

This isn’t the only example in which you could incur additional costs, sometimes medications lead to side-effects resulting in the need for added treatment.

What can we do to solve this?

The University of California – San Diego’s study reached the conclusion that to improve medication-related care, we need to expand comprehensive medication management programs, in which clinical pharmacists have access to complete medical records, improved dialogue with other members of a patient’s health care team and input as a medication is prescribed — similar to what is now taking place at many U.S. Veterans Affairs clinics.

How can Tria Health help?

Tria Health provides one-on-one consultations with pharmacists, allowing you to review all your medications and make sure everything is safe, affordable and effective.

Visit www.triahealth.com to learn more!

 

Source: Jonathan H. Watanabe, Terry McInnis, Jan D. Hirsch. Cost of Prescription Drug–Related Morbidity and Mortality. Annals of Pharmacotherapy, 2018; 106002801876515 DOI: 10.1177/1060028018765159

Diabetes and Eye Care

Circle_Eye Drop

Did you know that diabetes can cause eye problems and may lead to blindness? People with diabetes are 40% more likely to suffer from glaucoma and 60% more likely to develop cataracts. With regular checkups, you can keep your eyes healthy and catch problems early.

What kind of Eye Exam do I need?

The eye doctor will put drops in your eyes to see the retina. This is called a dilated eye exam. The eye drops will make the pupils or black part of your eyes bigger. Then your doctor can see the back of your eye and find any eye problems early.

Why should I get a Dilated Eye Exam?

Over time, high blood sugar can damage the tiny vessels that supply blood to the eyes. You can have eye damage even if your vision is fine. It has nothing to do with needing glasses.

How often should I get a Dilated Eye Exam?

You should get a dilated eye exam annually or as recommended by your eye doctor. Getting regular eye exams will help find any problems early, and prevent blindness.

 For additional recommendations on how you can avoid eye problems, visit the American Diabetes Association.

 

Have any questions?

Contact the Tria Health Help Desk at 1.888.799.8742