National Migraine & Headache Awareness Month

The World Health Organization places migraine as one of the 10 most disabling medical illnesses on Earth.2 June is National Migraine & Headache Awareness Month. This month is dedicated to raising public knowledge, addressing stigma and building a stronger community of patient advocates.4

Migraine Overview

A migraine can cause severe throbbing pain or a pulsing sensation, usually on one side of the head.3 Some people experience a warning symptom known as an aura that occurs before or with the headache. An aura can cause visual disturbances, difficulty speaking or tingling on one side of the face.3

If untreated, a migraine attack can last from four to 72 hours. How often migraine attacks occur varies from person to person.3

After an attack, people report feeling elated and any sudden head movement may bring on pain again briefly. If you get migraines regularly, it is important to keep a record of your attacks and how you treated them. Having this information on hand will be beneficial if you make an appointment with your doctor to discuss your headaches.3

Migraine Fast Facts2

  1. Migraine impacts over 37 million men, women and children in the United States.
  2. It is estimated that up to 148 million people in the world suffer from chronic migraine.
  3. Migraine is 3x more common in women than men. Migraine affects over 30% of women over a lifetime.
  4. Fewer than 5% have been seen by a health care provider.

Build a Support Network

Migraine is a disabling disease that no one should have to go through alone. It’s essential to build a support network of understanding people who can not only check in on you during an attack but also empathize with your experience. While there are a multitude of online support groups, talk with your friends and family about your experience. They are an invaluable resource to help you get through migraine attacks.5

Common Symptoms

Symptoms for headaches and migraines can differ but some of the most common are:1

  • Sensitivity to light and noise
  • Eye pain
  • Neck pain
  • Vomiting
  • Nausea

Tria Health and Migraines

Tria Health’s Pharmacy Advocate Program offers one-on-one, private consultations with a Tria Health Pharmacist. Your pharmacist will work with you and your doctor(s) to ensure you are getting the intended outcomes from your medications. Over the years, Tria Health has continued to expand our services to include a multitude of chronic conditions, including migraines.

Have any questions?

Contact the Tria Health Help Desk: 1.888.799.8742

Sources:

  1. Migraine Headache Symptoms, Medications, Treatment & Definition (medicinenet.com)
  2. The Facts About Migraine | American Migraine Foundation
  3. Migraine – Symptoms and causes – Mayo Clinic
  4. Migraine & Headache Awareness Month – CHAMP (migraineheadacheawarenessmonth.org)
  5. Why You Need a Migraine Support Network | AMF (americanmigrainefoundation.org)

June: National Migraine and Headache Awareness Month

For the month of June the goal is to raise awareness, address the stigma and build a stronger community of advocates. Migraine disease is one of the 20 most disabling medical illnesses in the world and the 12th most disabling disorder in the United States. More than 90% of migraine suffers can’t function normally during an attack.1 Migraine is an extraordinarily prevalent neurological disease, affecting 39 million men, women and children in the U.S. and 1 billion worldwide.5

Migraine Basics

Migraine is a genetic neurological disease, characterized by episodes often called Migraine attacks. They are quite different from regular headaches which are non-migrainous. Migraine sufferers may have moderate or severe pain and usually can’t participate in normal activities because of the pain. Many people experience migraines lasting for at least four hours or may last for days. The diagnosis usually happens if people have a combination of symptoms and doctors have ruled out other disorders.2

Build a Support Network

Migraine is a disabling disease that no one should have to go through alone. It’s essential to build a support network of understanding people who can not only empathize with your experience but be a helping hand during episodes. While there are a multitude of online support groups, talking with your friends and family about your experience will help since they are an invaluable resource to help you get through migraine attacks.3

Unusual Symptoms Related to Migraines

Some symptoms below aren’t associated with ‘regular’ migraine or headache episodes. Understanding all types of symptoms per episode can help recognize an episode before, during, and after it happens if ‘regular’ symptoms aren’t present.

For more information regarding National Migraine and Headache Awareness Month 2020 click here.

Tria Health and Migraines

Tria Health’s Pharmacy Advocate Program offers one-on-one, private consultations with a Tria Health Pharmacist. Your pharmacist will work with you and your doctor(s) to ensure you’re getting the intended outcomes from your medications.

Have any questions?

Contact the Tria Health Help Desk: 1.888.799.8742

Sources:

  1. https://migraine.com/living-migraine/yes-migraine-is-a-disability/
  2. https://migraine.com/migraine-basics/
  3. https://americanmigrainefoundation.org/resource-library/why-you-need-migraine-support-network/
  4. https://migraine.com/blog/i-had-no-idea-that-was-a-symptom/?via=recommend-reading
  5. https://migraineresearchfoundation.org/about-migraine/migraine-facts/

National Migraine & Headache Awareness Month

June is National Migraine & Headache Awareness Month. The goal of this month is to raise awareness, address the stigma and build a stronger community of advocates. Migraine disease is one of the 20 most disabling medical illnesses in the world and the 12th most disabling disorder in the United States. More than 90% of migraine suffers can’t function normally during an attack.1

Migraine 101

Migraine is a genetic neurological disease, characterized by episodes often called Migraine attacks. They are quite different from regular headaches which are non-migrainous. Migraine sufferers may have moderate or severe pain and usually can’t participate in normal activities because of the pain. Many people experience migraines lasting for at least four hours or may last for days. The diagnosis usually happens if people have a combination of symptoms and doctors have ruled out other disorders.2

Build a Support Network

Migraine is a disabling disease that no one should have to go through alone. It’s essential to build a support network of understanding people who can not only check in on you during an attack but also empathize with your experience. While there are a multitude of online support groups, talk with your friends and family about your experience. They are an invaluable resource to help you get through migraine attacks.3

Tria Health and Migraines

Tria Health’s Pharmacy Advocate Program offers one-on-one, private consultations with a Tria Health Pharmacist. Your pharmacist will work with you and your doctor(s) to ensure you’re getting the intended outcomes from your medications. Over the years, Tria Health has continued to expand our services to include a multitude of chronic conditions, including migraines.

Have any questions?

Contact the Tria Health Help Desk: 1.888.799.8742

Sources:

  1. https://migraine.com/living-migraine/yes-migraine-is-a-disability/
  2. https://migraine.com/migraine-basics/
  3. https://americanmigrainefoundation.org/resource-library/why-you-need-migraine-support-network/

Managing Your Migraines

Person holding coffee cup reading a book
Image Source: Nathan Dumlao/Unsplash

While medications can help treat and manage migraines, there are plenty of other healthy habits that can sometimes help prevent migraines. Lifestyle choices that promote good health can also reduce the frequency and severity of your migraines.1 Here are a few ways you can change up your routine to help prevent migraines:

Create Good Sleep Habits

Oftentimes, migraines can be triggered back lack of sleep. It’s important to not only build a good routine, but have proper sleep hygiene including:

  • Minimize Distractions: Stay off your phone and don’t watch TV in bed. It’s important to save your bedroom solely for sleep.
  • Reduce Stimulants: Avoid caffeine and other stimulants that can interfere with sleep a few hours before bed.

Exercise & Eat Healthy

During physical activity, your body releases certain chemicals that block pain signals to your brain. These chemicals also help alleviate anxiety and depression, which can make migraines worse.1 Your diet can also impact your migraines, it’s important to keep track of what you eat and try to identify and potential triggers.

Keep a Migraine Diary

Triggers can vary for any person who suffers from migraines. It’s important to keep track when your migraines start and what you were doing before, to help identify any possible triggers. According to the mayo clinic, until recently, avoiding migraine triggers was considered the best advice. But new research suggests this may actually increase sensitivity to potential triggers. A more useful approach may be to learn to cope with these headache triggers by using behavioral management techniques, such as identifying and challenging negative thoughts, relaxation training and stress reduction.

Have any Questions for us?

Contact the Tria Health Help Desk at 1.888.799.8742

 

Source:

  1. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/migraine-headache/in-depth/migraines/art-20047242

Ask a Pharmacist – Migraine Edition

Pharmacist surrounded by pills with text that reads Ask a Pharmacist
Image Source: iStock.com/macrovector

At Tria Health, our pharmacists are here for you! They are always happy to answer any of your medication-related questions. For September, we’ve compiled some of our more popular migraine questions, along with our pharmacists’ answers.

What are the most common migraine triggers?

  • Emotional Stress
  • Not Eating
  • Sleep Disturbances
  • Obesity
  • Some foods such as: wine, aspartame, and monosodium glutamate (MSGs)
  • Certain medications such as nitrates (used for chest pain)
  • Unmodifiable triggers like menstruation, weather changes, neck pain, certain odors or visual stimuli

What can worsen migraines?

Rapid head movements like sneezing or turning you head away quickly, bright lights, loud sounds, straining at stool, and physical exertion can all worsen migraines.

How do I cope with my migraine triggers?

As most triggers cannot be completely avoided, coping with known triggers is an important strategy in migraine relief. A staggering 80% of people with migraines say emotional stress is a trigger, but no one is immune to it. Check these tips out for how to manage your stress:

  • Meditate for 15 Minutes
  • Take a Break & Breathe Deeply
  • Laugh out Loud
  • Listen to Music
  • Get Moving
  • Keep a Journal

I don’t want to take a medicine, what can I do instead?

  • Relaxation Training
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
  • Physical therapy can be helpful for patients who have muscle tension leading up to a migraine
  • There is no good clinical data to recommend hypnosis, acupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), or chiropractic or osteopathic care, but some people find these methods appealing.

Dealing with migraines can have a definite impact on your lifestyle.  Having a better understanding of what triggers migraines and how to cope can help.

If you have any additional questions regarding your medications, reach out to the

Tria Health Help Desk: 1.888.799.8742