World Heart Day

World Heart Day is celebrated every year on September 29th, with the goal of informing people around the globe that cardiovascular disease (CVD), including heart disease and stroke, is the world’s leading cause of death claiming 17.5 million lives each year.1 World Heart Day also helps highlights the actions individuals can take to prevent and control CVD.

What is Cardiovascular Disease?

Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) can refer to a number of conditions including heart disease, heart attack, stroke, heart failure, arrhythmia or heart valve problems.2 According to the Global Atlas on cardiovascular disease prevention and stroke, over 17.5 million deaths each year are caused by CVD. Ischemic heart disease (eg heart attacks) is responsible for 7.3 million of the total CVD deaths and cerebrovascular disease (eg stroke) is responsible for 6.2 million of the total CVD deaths. This makes it the number one cause of death in the world today.1

Are you at Risk?

It’s important to visit your physician and receive regular checkups. At your next appointment, ask for a few simple checks:

  • Blood Glucose Levels
  • Blood Pressure Levels
  • Check your Numbers (Cholesterol, weight and body mass index (BMI)
  • Understand the Signs and Symptoms of a Heart Attack

How Can You Participate in World Heart Day?

Make a promise! “You could promise to cook and eat more healthily, to do more exercise and encourage your children to be more active, to say no to smoking and help your loved ones to stop.

A simple promise… for MY HEART, for YOUR HEART, for ALL OUR HEARTS.”3

Source:

  1. https://www.world-heart-federation.org/world-heart-day
  2. https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/consumer-healthcare/what-is-cardiovascular-disease
  3. https://www.world-heart-federation.org/world-heart-day/about/

Celebrate Move More Month!

Person walking up stairs
Image Source: Bruno Nascimento/Unsplash

Did you know that even small amounts of exercise can lead to significant health benefits? Because of this, the American Heart Association is urging adults to get moving, starting this April. A government study estimates that nearly 80 percent of adult Americans do not get the recommended amounts of exercise each week, potentially setting themselves up for years of health problems.1 The guidelines are based on current scientific evidence supporting the connections between physical activity, overall health and well-being, disease prevention and quality of life. Are you one of the 4 out of 5 Americans not meeting the guidelines? Get started today!

How much should you be exercising? 2

  • Get at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity or 75 minutes per week of vigorous aerobic activity, or a combination of both, preferably spread throughout the week.
  • Add moderate- to high-intensity muscle-strengthening activity (such as resistance or weights) on at least 2 days per week.
  • Spend less time sitting. Even light-intensity activity can offset some of the risks of being sedentary.
  • Gain even more benefits by being active at least 300 minutes (5 hours) per week.
  • Increase amount and intensity gradually over time.

What are the benefits of exercising? 3

There are numerous reasons why you should exercise on a regular basis. For starters, your overall mood will improve. Regular exercise can relieve stress, anxiety, depression and anger. In addition, there are multiple health benefits. Being more active can help you:

  • Lower your blood pressure
  • Boost your levels of good cholesterol
  • Improve blood flow (circulation)
  • Keep your weight under control
  • Prevent bone loss that can lead to osteoporosis

Have any Questions?

Contact the Tria Health Help Desk at 1.888.799.8742

Sources:

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/nhsr112.pdf
  2. https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/fitness/fitness-basics/aha-recs-for-physical-activity-in-adults
  3. https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/fitness/fitness-basics/why-is-physical-activity-so-important-for-health-and-wellbeing