November is American Diabetes Awareness Month

According to the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2020, prepared by the CDC, 34.2 million Americans-just over 1 in 10-have diabetes. Diabetes is one of the fastest growing medical conditions in the world. American Diabetes Month’s goal is to bring awareness about diabetes risk factors and encourage people to make healthy changes.

What is Diabetes:

Diabetes is a health condition that affects how the body turns food into energy. Most of the food we eat is broken down into glucose (sugar) which gives the body energy to function. When blood sugar goes up the pancreas releases insulin to allow the blood sugar to be used as energy. If the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, diabetes occurs.

Symptoms of diabetes include:

  • Thirst
  • Tiredness
  • Blurred Vision
  • Wounds that take a long time to heal
  • Weight Loss

Types of Diabetes:

  1. Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction that stops your body from making insulin. About 5% of the people with diabetes have type 1. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often develop quickly. It is usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. Those with type 1 diabetes must take insulin every day to survive. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes.
  2. Type 2 diabetes is when the body does not use insulin well and is unable to keep blood sugar at normal levels. Most people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. It develops over many years and is usually diagnosed in adults.  Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed with healthy lifestyle changes.
  3. Prediabetes is a serious health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes increases your risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke.
  4. Gestational Diabetes develops in pregnant women who have never had diabetes. If you have gestational diabetes, your baby could be at higher risk for health complications. Gestational diabetes is typically cured after your baby is born, but this increases your risk for type 2 diabetes later in life. Your baby is more likely to become obese as a child or teen, and more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life.

Are You at Risk?

Take the American Diabetes Association’s free Type 2 Diabetes risk test: http://www.diabetes.org/are-you-at-risk/diabetes-risk-test/

How to Lower Your Risk

Here are a few ways you can lower your risk of diabetes:

Tria Health & Diabetes Management

If you currently are diagnosed or have been recently diagnosed with diabetes, Tria Health can assist you in managing your medications and finding a treatment plan that works for you. Diabetes is a disease that can be managed and prevented if you know what to do. At Tria Health our pharmacists are certified diabetes educators (CDEs). They educate patients on medication management, diet and exercise so patients with diabetes can live happy and active lives and reduce the risk of serious health complications. For employers that offer Tria Health’s Diabetes Management Program, Tria provides free diabetes testing supplies including a blood glucose meter, testing strips, and a mobile app designed to help you manage your diabetes better.

Have Any Questions?

Call the Tria Help Desk: 1.888.799.8742 

Sources:

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/library/features/diabetes-stat-report.html
  2. https://www.publicholidayguide.com/awareness-day/american-diabetes-awareness-month-2020/
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/diabetes.html

Recall of Metformin Hydrochloride ER Tablets

Metformin Hydrochloride Extended Release Tablets are being recalled for having more carcinogen NDMA than the FDA’s acceptable allowance. NDMA is classified as a probable human carcinogen (a substance that could cause cancer) based on results from laboratory tests.  NDMA is a known environmental contaminant found in water and foods, including meats, dairy products, and vegetables.1 With levels above admissible according to the FDA it is being recalled ensuring no adverse reactions arise during consumption. If any adverse reactions are experienced you can submit them online here or find more information on how to mail or fax here. Many different retailers might be involved so it is important to check your label and bottle.

What products are being recalled?

Metformin HCl Extended Release Tablets, USP, 500 mg and 750 mg, manufactured by Amneal, are being recalled. They are the prescription, solid oral products that are indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.1

The Metformin Hydrochloride Extended Release Tablets, USP, 500 mg and 750 mg, subject to the recall, are identified by the NDC numbers stated on the product label.

Metformin HCl Extended Release Tablets, USP, 500 mg

Metformin HCl Extended Release Tablets, USP, 750 mg

*Amneal’s Metformin Hydrochloride Immediate Release Tablets, USP are not affected by this recall.1

Metformin HCI Extended Release Tablets manufactured by Bayshore Pharmaceuticals, LLC are also being recalled.

Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets USP, 500 mg and 750 mg lots subject to the recall are identified in the table below.

Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets manufactured by Marksans Pharma Limited, are being recalled due to the detection of N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) impurity.

Time-Cap Labs Inc. Metformin Hydrochloride for Extended-Release Tablets, USP 500 mg and 700 mg lots subject to the recall are identified below.

Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets, USP 500mg:

90 counts: 49483-623-09

100 counts: 49483-623-01

500 counts: 49483-623-50

1000 counts: 49483-623-10

Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets, USP 750mg:

100 counts: 49483-624-01

What’s next?

  • Because Metformin is used to treat serious medical conditions, patients taking the recalled Metformin should continue taking their medicine until they have a replacement product.
  • To determine whether a specific product has been recalled, patients should look at the drug name and company name on the label of their prescription bottle. If the information is not on the bottle, patients should contact the pharmacy that dispensed the medicine.
  • Patients should also contact their health care professional (the pharmacist who dispensed the medication or doctor who prescribed the medication) if their medicine is included in this recall to discuss their treatment, which may include another product not affected by this recall or an alternative treatment option.

Sources:

  1. https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/amneal-pharmaceuticals-llc-issues-voluntary-nationwide-recall-metformin-hydrochloride-extended#recall-announcement
  2. https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-alerts-patients-and-health-care-professionals-nitrosamine-impurity-findings-certain-metformin
  3. https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/bayshore-pharmaceuticals-llc-issues-voluntary-nationwide-recall-metformin-hydrochloride-extended
  4. https://www.miamiherald.com/news/health-care/article245133825.html

American Diabetes Month

American Diabetes Month.jpg

There are currently over 30.3 million adults with diabetes, 23.1 million are diagnosed, and 7.2 million are undiagnosed. Every year over 1.5 million Americans are diagnosed.1 American Diabetes Month’s goal is to bring awareness about diabetes risk factors and encourage people to make healthy changes.

How can you help?

  • Encourage friends and family members to take the type 2 diabetes risk assessment
  • Promote healthy diet and lifestyle habits
  • Share information about diabetes on social media to increase awareness

Are You at Risk?

Take the American Diabetes Association’s free Type 2 Diabetes risk test: http://www.diabetes.org/are-you-at-risk/diabetes-risk-test/

How to Lower Your Risk

Now that you’ve taken the test, here are a few ways you can lower your risk of diabetes:

Unfortunately, there are some risk factors you can’t change, like age, race, gender & family history. But being aware of your risk factors can help you take smart steps to improve your health in other ways.

Tria Health & Diabetes Management

If you currently are diagnosed or have been recently diagnosed with diabetes, Tria Health can assist you in managing your medications and finding a treatment plan that works for you. For employers that offer Tria Health’s Diabetes Management Program, Tria provides free diabetes testing supplies including a blood glucose meter, testing strips, and a mobile app designed to help you manage your diabetes better.

Have Any Questions?

Call the Tria Help Desk: 1.888.799.8742

 

Source:

  1. http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/

Do You Take an Aspirin a Day?

On May 2nd, The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a report regarding the use of daily aspirin to prevent a heart attack and stroke. The FDA’s findings may drastically alter how the health care industry utilizes daily aspirin therapy.

Background:
A number of patients take a daily aspirin due to the belief that it reduces their risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

“Primary Prevention” – Refers to patients with diabetes, family history of heart disease, high blood pressure and high cholesterol who have an increased risk of heart attacks and stroke and use aspirin as prevention (before either of these events occur).

“Secondary Prevention” – Refers to the use of daily aspirin therapy for patients who have had a heart attack, stroke, or having known coronary artery disease. Secondary prevention use of aspirin has well established benefits and significantly reduces the chance of a second heart attack or stroke.

The Update:
The FDA has reviewed new data regarding aspirin use for primary prevention and concluded that there is insufficient evidence at this time to support routine use of daily aspirin therapy in these patients.

What does this mean for you? 
If you have not had a heart attack, stroke, or have known coronary heart disease and you take a daily aspirin, talk to your physician about the need for continued use of aspirin and weigh the risk versus benefit of prolonged aspirin therapy.

Monitoring Your Blood Sugar

Monitoring blood sugar levels is an essential part of diabetes care. This provides the information needed to make adjustments to diet, exercise and medications. Waiting until symptoms of low or high blood sugar levels develop is a recipe for disaster.

Many things can cause blood sugar levels to change, such as: diet, exercise, stress, illness, drugs, and simply the time of day. Foods high in carbohydrates, emotional stress, infections, other medications, and early morning hours can cause blood sugar levels to rise. On the other hand, exercising can cause blood sugar levels to decrease.

Blood sugar levels can be measured easily at home or anywhere. Most blood sugar monitoring devices use a drop of blood obtained by pricking the tip of the finger with a small lancet. Most people find the pricking nearly painless. The machines are smaller than a deck of cards.

It is a good idea to keep a record of your blood sugar levels and report them to your doctor or nurse for dose adjustments of your medicines if necessary. Many people can learn to adjust the insulin dose on their own as necessary.