Get Ready for Flu Season

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Fall is approaching which means that the 2020-2021 flu season is also. Experts recommend the flu shot now more than ever as the coronavirus pandemic could mix with flu season. This overlap could cause major issues and overwhelm hospitals. It is critical to get vaccinated, as preventing the flu saves lives and preserves healthcare resources.

Why you should get vaccinated

Influenza affects people differently. While some people only develop mild symptoms, others develop serious illnesses such as bacterial pneumonia, ear, and sinus infections. The flu can worsen chronic medical conditions like heart failure, asthma, and diabetes. This contagious disease affects the lungs which can lead to hospitalization and sometimes death. People that are infected with influenza can spread the disease for up to 5-7 days. Getting vaccinated not only protects you but the people around you.

Key facts about the flu shot

  • The flu shot is recommended every year for anyone 6 months and older.
  • September and October are the best months to get the flu shot.
  • Antibodies develop in the body around two weeks after the vaccination.
  • Common side effects of the shot include low grade headache, soreness at injection site, muscle aches, nausea, and fatigue. Keep in mind that these potential side effects are nothing compared to the pain of contacting the flu.
  • The influenza virus spreads via droplets when people cough or sneeze which is why it is so important to wash your hands regularly.
  • The most common flu symptoms include fever, chills, cough, sore throat, body aches, and fatigue. Although these symptoms are similar to the common cold, the flu is more severe, develops quicker, and leads to severe complications.
  • Vaccine effectiveness varies from year to year. Characteristics of the person being vaccinated such as age and health affect its effectiveness.
  • There is a high-dose shot called Fluzone High-Dose, or FLAUD, available for people 65 and older. FLUAD has four times the antigen than a regular dose has. It works by pairing a regular vaccine with an immune stimulant increasing the response to a vaccine.

Why the flu vaccination is especially important this year

COVID-19 has caused health care facilities to be full. If people do not get a flu shot and contract the flu, they will have to seek treatment which may increase their exposure and risk of contracting the coronavirus. Furthermore, oxygen and ventilators are resources used to keep both COVID-19 and flu patients alive. If there is a big influx of flu patients this year, there is a possibility of people having to compete for resources. Protect yourself and others by getting vaccinated!

Do you have any questions regarding the flu vaccine?

Tria Health provides one-on-one confidential counseling with a pharmacist for any of your medication related questions. If Tria Health is currently a part of your healthcare plan, call the Tria Health Help desk today for any of your questions.

Tria Help Desk: 1.888.799.8742

Sources:

  1. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2020/08/21/flu-shot-during-covid-what-know-2020-2021-season/3392376001/
  2. https://www.today.com/health/flu-season-2020-2021-what-know-when-get-flu-shot-t188740
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/keyfacts.htm

National Influenza Vaccination Week

It’s National Influenza Vaccination Week! While flu activity can begin as early as October, it can last well into March. The CDC and its partners choose December for NIVW to remind people that it is not too late to get a flu vaccine. With this holiday approaching, it’s important to get vaccinated to help protect both you and others from the flu. Even if you haven’t yet been vaccinated and have already gotten sick with flu, you can still benefit from vaccination since the flu vaccine protects against three or four different flu viruses (depending on which flu vaccine you get).1

What are the benefits of the flu vaccine?

  • The flu vaccine can keep you from getting the flu
    • If you still get sick, the flu vaccination has been shown to reduce the severity.
  • Flu vaccination helps prevent serious medical events associated with some chronic conditions
    • Vaccination has been associated with lower rates of some cardiac events among people with heart disease, especially among those who had had a cardiac event in the past year.
  • Vaccination can help protect both children and women during/after pregnancy.

Do you have any questions regarding the flu vaccine?

Tria Health provides one-on-one confidential counseling with a pharmacist for any of your medication related questions. If Tria Health is currently a part of your healthcare plan, call the Tria Health Help desk today for any of your questions.

Tria Help Desk: 1.888.799.8742

Source:

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/nivw/about.htm

Get Ready for Flu Season!

Mug surrounded by tissues
Image Source: Kelly Sikkema/Unsplash

The 2018-2019 flu season is upon us.  It is important to begin getting your vaccination now.  The flu shot takes about 2 weeks to work and your immunity will last through the spring. Here are two of the biggest flu season questions answered:

I’m healthy, Do I really need the flu vaccine?

Yes.  Influenza is a contagious disease which affects the lungs and can lead to a more serious illness.  The flu vaccine is recommended for anyone 6 months of age or older.  Some individuals are at more risk of complications of the flu and should consider vaccination including pregnant women, older people, and individuals with chronic medical conditions like asthma, diabetes and heart disease.

When is the right time to get the vaccine, can I get it too early? 

Now is the right time to get the flu vaccine.  Flu activity can begin as early as October and last well into March.  If the influenza virus is circulating, you should still get the flu vaccine.  Flu season can often last into the spring, and the sooner you get vaccinated, the more effective it will be.

Do you have any questions regarding the flu vaccine?

Tria Health provides one-on-one confidential counseling with a pharmacist for any of your medication related questions. If Tria Health is currently a part of your healthcare plan, call the Tria Health Help desk today for any of your questions.

Tria Help Desk: 1.888.799.8742

It’s National Influenza Vaccination Week! It’s NOT too late to get your flu shot!

Doctor with Sign Reading Flu Shot
Image Source: iStock.com/CatLane

Established by the CDC in 2005, the week of December 3rd is National Influenza Vaccination Week. During this week, we highlight the importance of continuing flu vaccination through the holiday season and beyond.

The Flu is a contagious virus!

The flu is the real deal, folks! The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat and lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness and can affect people of all ages, even those in good health. The CDC estimates that:

  • Since 2010, the flu has resulted in between 9.2 million and 35.6 million illnesses each year in the United States.
  • The flu results in between 140,000 and 710,000 hospitalizations each year.
  • Influenza-associated deaths ranged from 12,000 to 56,000 between 2011 – 2013.

Protect yourself and get a vaccine!

  • Getting an annual flu vaccine is the best way to protect yourself and your loved ones from this potentially serious disease.
  • A vaccine also protects people around you, especially babies, young children, older people and people with certain chronic conditions.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
  • Avoid touching your T-Zone (eyes, nose and mouth).
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water (or a hand sanitizer with a minimum of 60% alcohol).
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs.

Flu shots are available at many locations!

Visit your primary care physician (PCP) to get your flu shot today! If you don’t have a PCP, or need to find someplace to go, visit the CDC’s HealthMap Vaccine Finder to find someplace close to home or work.

Learn more

Visit the CDC’s Frequently Asked Flu Questions 2017-2018 Flu Season to learn what’s new this flu season.

For yourself and those around you, Tria Health recommends getting your annual flu vaccine.

Stay Healthy This Flu Season!

Doctor with Sign Reading Flu Shot
Image Source: iStock.com/CatLane

The 2017-2018 flu season is upon us.  It is important to begin getting your vaccination now.  The flu shot takes about 2 weeks to work.  Your immunity will last through the spring.

Here are five of the biggest flu season questions answered.

I’m healthy, Do I really need the flu vaccine?

Yes.  Influenza is a contagious disease which affects the lungs and can lead to a more serious illness.  The flu vaccine is recommended for anyone 6 months of age or older.  Some individuals are at more risk of complications of the flu vaccine and should consider vaccination including pregnant women, older people, and individuals with chronic medical conditions like asthma, diabetes and heart disease.

When is the right time to get the vaccine, can I get it too early? 

Now is the right time to get the flu vaccine.  Flu activity can begin as early as October and last well into March.  If the influenza virus is circulating, you should still get the flu vaccine.  Flu season can often last into the spring, and sooner you get vaccinated, the more effective it will be.

But can I get the flu from the vaccine?

No, you can’t. Flu vaccines  are developed using dead or weakened viruses that allow your body to develop the antibodies needed to fight the infection, but that won’t actually cause the disease. Flu-like symptoms can be related to other viral illnesses and you can potentially contract the flu virus while you are waiting for your immunity to build up from the vaccine.  You cannot catch the flu from the vaccine.

What are the symptoms of the flu?

The flu is a respiratory illness, and it’s usually spread through the air by people coughing and sneezing. The most common symptoms include fever, chills, cough, sore throat, body aches and fatigue.  The flu is generally much more severe than the common cold, but the symptoms can be similar. The flu tends to develop very quickly and can cause much more severe complications like pneumonia or bacterial infections. A test can be done in the first few days of infection that can determine if you have the flu or a cold.

How do I prevent spread of the flu?

The most effective thing you can do to protect yourself from the flu is to get a vaccine if you haven’t already. Other important ways to help prevent the flu include: wash your hands regularly and cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.  If you do develop symptoms, stay home from work or school to avoid spreading the flu to those around you.