National Nutrition Month

Bowls of fruit and oatmeal
Image Source: Melissa Belanger/Unsplash

National Nutrition Month® is a nutrition education and information campaign created annually in March by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The campaign focuses on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

How can you get involved?1

  • Choose foods and drinks that are good for your health.
  • Include a variety of healthful foods from all of the food groups on a regular basis.
  • Select healthier options when eating away from home.
  • Be mindful of portion sizes. Eat and drink the amount that’s right for you.
  • Keep it simple. Eating right doesn’t have to be complicated.
  • Make food safety part of your everyday routine.
  • Help to reduce food waste by considering the foods you have on hand before buying more at the store.
  • Find activities that you enjoy and be physically active most days of the week.

Looking for healthy recipes?

In honor of National Nutrition Month, Tria Health has assembled some of our favorite nutritional recipes:

Chronic Conditions and Nutrition

If you have a chronic condition, a carefully planned diet can make a difference. With certain diseases, what you eat may reduce symptoms. In other cases, diet can improve health. Although your diet might differ depending on your condition and lifestyle, there are three keys to a healthy eating plan that will work for diabetes, heart health, cancer prevention and weight management:

  • Eat meals and snacks regularly (at planned times).
  • Eat about the same amount of food at each meal or snack.
  • Choose healthful foods to support a healthy weight and heart.

Have any questions? Contact the Tria Health Help Desk at 1.888.799.8742.

Source:

  1. https://www.eatright.org/food/resources/national-nutrition-month/national-nutrition-month-celebration-toolkit

Heart-Healthy Thanksgiving Recipes

As Thanksgiving approaches, it can be stressful trying to maintain a healthy diet surrounded by indulgences. While it’s true that sweets can be enjoyed in moderation, there are still plenty of alternatives available so you can treat yourself and stay true to your healthy lifestyle. To help you get through the Thanksgiving season, we’ve compiled a list of our favorite Heart-Healthy recipes:

 Slow Cooker Turkey Breast

Turkey

Healthy Green Bean Casserole

Green Bean

Maple-Roasted Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Light & Luscious Pumpkin Pie

Pumpkin Pie

 

Have any questions for us?

Contact the Tria Health Help Desk at 1.888.799.8742

Tips for a Healthier YOU this Thanksgiving (and year-round, if we’re being honest)

Close up of thanksgiving dinner
Image Source: iStock.com/shironosov

Thanksgiving doesn’t have to sabotage your diet OR your weight! Let’s be honest … we all love mom’s cooking at our holiday celebrations. And, during holiday season we tend to have a lax attitude toward diet and exercise. With more social gatherings, so we’re tempted to eat and drink excess calories. But—if we’re being honest—aren’t these temptations always here?

We all have birthdays, weddings and various celebrations throughout the year. So, the truth is, we must be cognizant of these things year-round if we expect to see results from a healthy diet and exercise program.

The best advice to be a healthier version of YOU is to follow these tips throughout the year, not just during this holiday season. It is proven that the best way to lose weight, and keep it off, is to adopt real life changes and stick with them.

Our clinical team here at Tria Health invite you to enjoy these tips to enjoy your Thanksgiving holiday (and every day) WITHOUT feeling guilty!

Be Active

Create a calorie deficit by exercising BEFORE you indulge this holiday season!

However, this should be a year-round event. The American Heart Association recommends at least 150-minutes of moderate activity each week. An easy way to remember this is 30 minutes at least 5 days a week, but three 10-minute periods of activity are as beneficial to your overall fitness as one 30-minute session.

Eat breakfast

This Thanksgiving, don’t save up your calories for the main event! Try a light and nutritious breakfast with protein and fiber—this will fill you up and have lasting effects so it’s easier to make better choices about what goes on your plate.

This doesn’t just apply to Thanksgiving either. The Mayo Clinic reports that eating breakfast allows you to eat more vitamins and minerals, control your weight and blood sugar, eat less fat and cholesterol and perform better at work.

Try Lighter Recipes

Whether you’re hosting Thanksgiving dinner or bringing a dish or two to share, try making your recipes a little lighter by using fat-free broth, sugar substitutes, reducing butter and oil, or adding plain yogurt in your creamy casseroles.

Our advice for year-round is that healthy food doesn’t have to taste like you’re eating diet food. Yes, focus on the veggies and watch your portions, but for a lifestyle adoption, eat a well-balanced diet.

Be Selective

Try spending your calories on items that are only available during the holiday season. Or better yet, stick to the lighter options like white turkey meat, plain veggies, roasted sweet potatoes and pumpkin pie. However, if you keep your portions small, eat what you like!

Throughout the year, practice prior planning to balance your calories. Know you’re going out with the girls or catching the game with the guys? Eat lighter that day so you don’t have to feel guilty later.

 

Skip the Seconds

Try to resist a second helping, and know that you’ll have an extra day of leftovers. Besides, who doesn’t love leftover Thanksgiving dinner? If you practice this all year, what effect might that have on your physique?

Savor the Flavor

Eating slowly and putting your fork down between bites will help you feel satisfied stopping after your first plate. This works every day, folks—not just on Thanksgiving Day!

Go Easy On Alcohol

Don’t forget that these calories count too! Try drinking a glass of water in between alcoholic beverages to stay hydrated and feel full—again, all year long!

We hope you enjoyed our tips to a healthier you this Thanksgiving. All of us at Tria Health are wishing you and yours a very Happy Thanksgiving! Be safe, be well and cheers to a healthier YOU!

New U.S. Dietary Guidelines

The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services have issued updated nutritional guidelines.  These guidelines are updated every 5 years and aim to reflect the latest science-based evidence about what we eat.

Major changes from previous guidelines include:

  • Added sugars should make up less than 10% of your diet. This does not include naturally-occurring sugars such as those found in milk or fruit.
  • Saturated fats should account for less than 10% of your diet. Saturated fats include butter, whole milk, non-lean meats.
  • Adults should consume less than 2300 mg of sodium (salt) per day.
  • No specific restrictions on total fat intake, just limit saturated fats.

The sugar and fat intake recommendations are highlighted in an effort to curb the rising incidence of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.  The best bet for healthy eating continues to follow the same pattern which includes incorporating a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy, and lean proteins.

Access the full updated guidelines by visiting www.health.gov.