Depression’s Impact on Patients with Chronic Disease

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Image Source: Zhu Liang/Unsplash

According to a RAND corporation study, people who are depressed are less likely to adhere to medications for their chronic health problems than people who are not depressed. Researchers found that patients with depression had 76% greater odds of being non-adherent with their medications compared to those without depression.1 This is a concern since not only do people with chronic illnesses routinely face higher death rates when they have poor medication adherence, the rate of depression itself has been increasing significantly over the years. In the U.S., depression increased from 6.6 percent to 7.3 percent from 2005 to 2015.2

What can Doctors and Providers do?

Dr. Walid F. Gellad, the study’s senior author and a natural scientist a RAND, recommended that “doctors and other providers should periodically ask patients with depression about medication adherence. Also, when treating a patient who is not taking their medication correctly, they should consider the possibility that depression is contributing to the problem.”

How can you help a Friend or Family Member with Depression?

It’s important to learn the symptoms of depression and that they can vary from person to person. You can find a list of symptoms and support recommendations provided by the mayo clinic here. Once you recognize it, the next steps are to:

  • Talk to the person
  • Explain that depression is a medical condition
  • Suggest seeking help from a professional
  • Offer to help prepare a list of questions to discuss in an initial appointment
  • Express your willingness to help

If you or someone you know is struggling, call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) at any time for help.

 

Questions?

Call the Tria Health Help Desk at 1.888.799.8742

 

Sources:

  1. The Rand Corporation. (2011, May 10). Depression Associated with Lower Medication Adherence Among Patients with Chronic Disease [Press release]. Retrieved from https://www.rand.org/news/press/2011/05/10.html
  2. Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. “Depression is on the rise in the US, especially among young teens.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 October 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171030134631.htm>.

Driving Patients to Take an Active Role in Their Health Care

Katherine Meiners
Katherine Meiners, Director of Marketing & Communications

Central Exchange kicked off its 6 part Health Care Catalyst Series last week featuring consumer strategies related to having a healthy business. The presentation was led by Brent Walker, Chief Marketing Officer of C2B Solutions. Walker spent 20 years working for Proctor & Gamble prior to starting C2B Solutions.

The presentation focused on the importance of understanding psychographic segmentation in the health care consumer. C2B Solutions conducted a study that included a sample of 4,878 patients who completed a survey with 384 questions/attributes.

The study identified 5 different patient profiles:

  1. Balance Seekers (18%) – This group is proactive and wellness-oriented. They are open to many ideas, sources of information and treatment options when it comes to their healthcare.
  2. Willful Endurers (27%) – The highest population, this group takes a “don’t fix it if it’s not broken” approach to their health.
  3. Priority Jugglers (18%) – These individuals are busy taking care of others and are motivated by family verses by self.
  4. Self-Achievers (24%) – Highly motivated, this group focuses on future plans and is the most proactive when it comes to their wellness. They are task oriented and prefer to be given measurable goals.
  5. Direction Takers (13%) – The smallest population, these individuals like direction from providers and take it.

The varying differences in the patient profiles emphasize the need to communicate important health care messages differently. Traditionally, clinicians have been taught to speak to every patient as “direction takers.” With an increased focus on patient outcomes, clinicians need to learn how to better communicate with patients so they take an active role in their health care based on the different profiles. The benefit of the one-on-one counseling provided by Tria Health is our clinicians get an understanding of who the patient is and what motivates their medication behavior.

Find out what kind of patient you are by visiting C2Bsolutions.com.

Written by Katherine Meiners, Director of Marketing & Communications at Tria Health

Do You Take an Aspirin a Day?

On May 2nd, The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a report regarding the use of daily aspirin to prevent a heart attack and stroke. The FDA’s findings may drastically alter how the health care industry utilizes daily aspirin therapy.

Background:
A number of patients take a daily aspirin due to the belief that it reduces their risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

“Primary Prevention” – Refers to patients with diabetes, family history of heart disease, high blood pressure and high cholesterol who have an increased risk of heart attacks and stroke and use aspirin as prevention (before either of these events occur).

“Secondary Prevention” – Refers to the use of daily aspirin therapy for patients who have had a heart attack, stroke, or having known coronary artery disease. Secondary prevention use of aspirin has well established benefits and significantly reduces the chance of a second heart attack or stroke.

The Update:
The FDA has reviewed new data regarding aspirin use for primary prevention and concluded that there is insufficient evidence at this time to support routine use of daily aspirin therapy in these patients.

What does this mean for you? 
If you have not had a heart attack, stroke, or have known coronary heart disease and you take a daily aspirin, talk to your physician about the need for continued use of aspirin and weigh the risk versus benefit of prolonged aspirin therapy.

Preventing Antibiotic Resistance

Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacteria are capable of resisting the effects of
antibiotics. This can occur for many reasons for example, taking antibiotics when you do not have an infection caused by bacteria or not taking antibiotics as prescribed by your doctor.

Many common infections like the common cold, most sore throats and the flu are actually caused by viruses. Antibiotics are only effective against infections caused by bacteria and cannot kill viruses. Overuse and overprescribing of antibiotics has markedly increased bacterial resistance in recent years. We all normally have bacteria that live on and in our bodies. The more antibiotics we take the more likely these bacteria are to become resistant to antibiotics and potentially cause infection.

Some common signs that you may have an infection caused by bacteria and you should contact your physician include:

  • Fever higher than 100 °F
  • Symptoms that last more than 7-10 days
  • Symptoms that are not relived by over the counter medications

What can you do to prevent antibiotic resistance?

  • If prescribed antibiotics make sure to take the full course of antibiotics and follow the prescription directions
  • Don’t always assume that an antibiotic will be the answer to your cold and flu symptoms

(Written by Tria Health Pharmacy Student Intern Jessica McClain, UMKC School of Pharmacy)

Sleep Smart to Improve Energy, Outlook and Productivity

Does it often take you more than 30 minutes to fall asleep at night? Or do you wake up frequently during the night — or too early in the morning — and have a hard time going back to sleep? When you awaken, do you feel groggy and lethargic? Do you feel drowsy during the day particularly during monotonous situations?  If you answered YES to any of these questions, you make be suffering from a sleeping issue, and you are not alone.

America is currently a sleep deprived country.  Overall sleep time is twenty percent less than a century ago!  The importance of sleep is vital and is not getting the attention that it deserves.

 The importance of sleep:

  • Restoration – energy to brain and body and allows for tissue growth and repair
  • Health – promotes healthy immune system, regulates hormones, growth, appetite, and mood
  • Memory consolidation

Sleep Stats:

  • 36% Americans drive drowsy/fall asleep – it is estimated that >100,000 auto crashes annually occur resulting in 1500 deaths.
  • 29% drowsy or fall asleep at work
  • 20% have lost interest in intimacy
  • 14% have missed social/family functions due to excessive fatigue

Sleep Quantity and Quality

Sleep quality refers to sleep efficiency. TIME IN BED=TIME SLEEPING!!

Frequent interruptions can lead to loss of important sleep stages.  Insomnia can result from medical or lifestyle/environmental contributors.  Medical insomnia often refers to sleep apnea, narcolepsy or restless leg syndrome (RLS).  Lifestyle/ environmental insomnia typical results from “sleep stealers.”

How much sleep is enough?

Age Sleep Needs
Newborns (1-2mon) 10.5-18 hours
Infants (3-11 mon) 9-12 hour nights and 4 naps/day
Toddlers (1-3yr) 12-14 hours
Children (3-5 yr) 11-13 hours
Children (5-12 yr) 10-11 hours
Teens 8.5-9.25 hours
Adults 7-9 hours
Older adults 7-9 hours

Common Sleep Stealers

  • Psychological – stress in the number one cause of short-term insomnia
  • Lifestyle Stressors – irregular sleep/exercise schedule, alcohol, caffeine
  • Shift work
  • Jet lag
  • Environment – temperature, light, noise, children/spouse, pets
  • Medical

Analyzing YOUR sleep habits

Look at your individual sleep patterns and behaviors.  Keeping a sleep diary is a great way to document your sleep quality and quantity.  It will also help you identify “sleep stealers.”

  • Identify fatigue level
  • Trouble staying awake during monotonous activities?
  • Unusually irritable??
  • Difficulty concentrating or remembering facts?

Small changes YOU can make- Non-pharmacological Treatments and Solutions

  • Maintain regular sleep schedules – avoid “sleeping in” on weekends.  Daily sunlight exposure is important as well
  • Avoid post lunch caffeine
  • Avoid nicotine and alcohol within 2 hours of bedtime
  • Exercise regularly and earlier in the day – goal 30 minutes most days of the week preferably late afternoon (4-6 hrs before bed- this allows your body to cool down before bed)
  • Save bedroom for sleep and intimacy ONLY
  • Relax/unwind before bed- try to keep T.V., computers and smart phones out of the bedroom
  • Avoid daytime napping
  • Control bedroom temperature- a cool environment is usually best
  • Don’t lie in bed awake- if unable to fall asleep within 10 minutes, get out of bed and do something relaxing like reading or listening to soft music until drowsy
  • Stay up later? Make gradual changes to schedule to improve sleep efficiency

Tria Health Circle of CareVisit Triahealth.com or call our Tria Help Desk at 1.888.799.TRIA (8742) for more information.