How to Set Attainable Resolutions

Woman exercising outside
Image Source: Emma Simpson/Unsplash

The New Year is almost here! While we’re all excited for a fresh start and a chance to make some positive changes, it can be easy for our resolutions to fall astray if we don’t properly prepare. We want to help you along your journey and increase the likelihood of your resolutions sticking. Building healthy habits can change your life and decrease the chance of you getting a chronic condition. Follow these steps to help you set and keep your resolutions.

  1. Choose a Realistic Resolution: As much as we’d all like to be able to become expert guitar plays or marathon runners, it’s not always attainable within a year. It’s important to set realistic goals to increase the likelihood of achieving them. So maybe instead of becoming a marathon runner, your goal is to start running once a week.
  2. Focus on One Goal at a Time: While you might be able to accomplish all your goals, you’ll increase your success if you instead focus on one or maybe two main goals.
  3. Break it down: Now that you have your goal in mind, it’s time to break it down and plan. If we’re sticking with our running example, that means planning one day a week to run. Start small and then throughout the year work up to maybe running 2-3 times a week.  
  4. Find Support: A support system can be essential to meeting your goals. Having someone to hold you accountable can help give you the push you need. But make sure if you ask for someone’s help, you’re specific in what you’re asking of them. Whether it be words of affirmation or a gym buddy, you need to be clear for it to be beneficial.
  5. Don’t Give Up: Mistakes will happen, just remember that one mistake doesn’t have to derail your goals. Learn, adapt and overcome the challenges you face.

Resolution Ideas for Medication Health

Improving your medication health is a great resolution idea. to keep you healthy in the new year. Here’s what you can do:

  • Review all your medications with your pharmacist at least once a year. Having an expert review your medications will keep you healthy. Even if your medications don’t change, changes in your body and your reaction to medications can impact medication effectiveness over time.
  • Carry your medication list with you and review your list with other health care providers at your appointments. Many times, health care providers might not have visibility into your medication regimen. Having this information can ensure better health care decision making.
  • Make sure you are up to date with vaccinations and preventative screenings.  Early detection is key to effective treatment and can mean life or death…literally.
  • Follow all diet and exercise recommendations from your health care team.
  • Schedule and attend all yearly physicals and checkups

Questions?

If your health plan includes Tria Health, you can talk with a clinically trained pharmacist and receive a customized care plan. This includes recommendations for medication adjustments, preventative services and lifestyle modifications. Tria’s pharmacist will be able to help you achieve your goals and improve your health.

Visit www.triahealth.com to learn more.

Clean Medicine Start for a New Year!

Each year millions of us resolve to take better care of ourselves and families.  Often this is a resolution to eat better,  quit smoking,  be more consistent with medicines, or even lose weight to get off a medication or two.  Why not start the New Year with a clean medicine cabinet?

Gather all your medications and supplements together, and follow these guidelines:

  • Take stock of what you have and refill chronic medications you will soon need.
  • Expired or rarely used medications should be thrown out.
  • If you have not used the medication or supplement in the last 6 months and do not see a likely need for it in the next 6 months dispose of this too.
  • For tips on proper disposal, check out these guidelines on the FDA’s website or visit disposemymeds.org.
  • If possible, store all the medications together for ease of use and convenience.
  • Pain medications or other controlled substances should be safely stored out of reach of children and other “curious” adults.

You’ll be left with a cleaner, better organized, and smaller medication supply.  This will also reduce the likelihood you go out and buy more allergy medication when Spring rolls around; because you know you already have some!

Happy New Year!

New Year’s Resolution: Maintain a HEALTHY Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is one of the most prevalent health conditions seen in the United States.  Elevated blood pressure leads to increased risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney disease and death if undetected.

High blood pressure is called the “silent killer” because it often has no warning signs or symptoms, and many people don’t realize they have it. That’s why it’s important to get your blood pressure checked regularly.

New guidelines state:

  • People < 60 years old have a blood pressure goal of < 140/90 mmHg
  • People > 60 years old have a blood pressure goal of < 150/90 mmHg

How to achieve and maintain healthy blood pressure:

  • Eat a healthy diet. Eating a healthy diet can help keep your blood pressure down. Eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetable in addition to foods that are low in saturated fat and cholesterol.  Also limit amount of daily caffeine found in coffee, teas and soda.
    High sodium is a known culprit for increasing blood pressure.  Try to decrease the amount of sodium you add to you foods.  Be aware that many processed foods (including canned soups and frozen “healthy” meals) and restaurant meals are high in sodium.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight can raise your blood pressure. Losing weight can help you lower your blood pressure.
  • Be physically active. Physical activity can help lower blood pressure. The Surgeon General recommends adults engage in moderate-intensity exercise for 2 hours and 30 minutes every week.
  • Stop smoking!  Smoking increases your blood pressure while increasing your risk of heart disease, cancer and breathing complications

If lifestyle changes are not enough to keep your blood pressure at goal, medications may need to be added.  Usually one medication is started and the dose is increased until you are able to reach and maintain a healthy blood pressure.  A second or even third medication may need to be added if blood pressure remains elevated after one month of treatment.

If you have questions, call the Tria Help Desk at 1.888.799.8742.