National Wear Red Day

February 4th is National Wear Red Day. This day focuses on increasing awareness for women’s heart health. While most heart disease and stroke deaths are preventable, cardiovascular diseases continue to be the greatest health risk for women.

We want to educate women so that they can lower their chances of experiencing a heart attack or stroke. Making a commitment to improving your health does not have to be a solo journey— Tria Health is here to guide the way!

What Does a Stroke Look Like in Women?

Stroke Symptoms in Women1:

  • Numbness or weakness in face, arm, or leg
  • Trouble speaking or understanding speech
  • Vision problems
  • Trouble walking or a lack of coordination
  • Severe headache without a known cause

Remember “F.A.S.T.” to know when to call for help:

  1. F = Face drooping
  2. A = Arm weakness
  3. S = Speech difficulty
  4. T = Time to call 911

It can be easy to miss the symptoms of a stroke due to their subtle symptoms. However, delaying proper treatment can lead to delays in time-sensitive, lifesaving treatments.

What Does a Heart Attack Look Like in Women?

Heart Attack Symptoms in Women2:

  • Chest pain, but not always
  • Pain or pressure in the lower chest or upper abdomen
  • Jaw, neck, or upper back pain
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Shortness of breath
  • Fainting
  • Indigestion
  • Extreme fatigue

If you experience any of these signs or symptoms:

  1. Dial 911 immediately, follow the operator’s instructions, and get to a hospital right away.
  2. Don’t drive yourself to the hospital.
  3. Try to stay as calm as possible and take deep, slow breaths while you wait for the emergency responders.

Women who think they’re healthy often misread the symptoms of a heart attack because they don’t think it could happen to them.

Educate yourself on these conditions so that you can more clearly identify them if they were to arise in you or someone you know. Women, take control of your heart health this year. 

Tria Health Helps Control Heart Disease

Tria Health offers Chronic Condition Management through our Pharmacy Advocate Program. Heart Disease and stroke are two of the many chronic conditions that Tria Health supports. Clinical pharmacists provide one-on-one telephonic counseling for members and act as their personal advocate to help them navigate through the health care system. Through reviewing a member’s medications and lifestyle habits, Tria Health’s Pharmacists can make recommendations that will help control their chronic conditions and help them feel better!

Questions?

Call 1.888.799.8742 or visit www.triahealth.com.

Wear Red and Support Heart Health!

Resources

  1. Symptoms of a Stroke in Women and Men | Go Red for Women
  2. Symptoms of a Heart Attack in Women and Men | Go Red for Women
  3. Go Red for Women | The American Heart Association’s signature women’s initiative

American Diabetes Association Alert Day

Image Source: Canva

American Diabetes Association Alert Day is observed annually on the fourth Tuesday in March. This day is dedicated to spreading awareness of type 2 diabetes and encouraging people to take the ADA risk test.1

Understand Your Risk

An important part of today is learning about the risk factors of diabetes. Being aware of your risk factors can help you take the right steps to improve your health. Take the American Diabetes Risk Test here: Risk Test | ADA (diabetes.org) This test asks questions about weight, age, family history and other potential risks for type 2 diabetes.2

Common risks include:

  • Being over the age of 451
  • Having a family history of diabetes1
  • Not being physically active1
  • High blood pressure4
  • Abnormal cholesterol levels4

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Lower your risk for type 2 diabetes by implementing these lifestyle choices:

  • Eating healthier: choose foods higher in fiber and lower in fat (fruits, vegetables, whole grains).5
  • Physical activity: aerobic activity such as swimming, running, or a fast walk for about 150 or more minutes a week.5
  • Weight loss: If you have prediabetes, losing 7-10% of your body weight can reduce the risk of diabetes.5
  • Stop Smoking

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. According to the CDC. Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90-95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults.6 Other key facts about diabetes include:

  • Diabetes affects about 34.2 million Americans.1
  • Nearly 1 in 5 adults living with diabetes, or 7.3 million Americans do not know that they have the disease.1
  • About 88 million people that are 18 years or older have prediabetes. Prediabetes happens when blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not quite high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes.1
  • About 50% of women that have gestational diabetes, a type of diabetes that women develop when pregnant, end up developing type 2 diabetes.1

Tria Health & Diabetes Management

If you currently are diagnosed or have been recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, Tria Health can assist you in managing your medications and finding a treatment plan that works for you. For select members, Tria Health also provides free diabetes testing supplies including a blood glucose meter, testing strips, and a mobile app designed to help you manage your diabetes better.

Questions?

Contact the Tria Health Help Desk at 1.888.799.8742

Sources:

  1. Diabetes Alert Day | NIDDK (nih.gov)
  2. Stop Diabetes:
  3. American Diabetes Association Alert Day | A Complete Guide (lifeweknow.com)
  4. Understand Your Risk for Diabetes | American Heart Association
  5. Type 2 diabetes – Symptoms and causes – Mayo Clinic
  6. Type 2 Diabetes Statistics and Facts (healthline.com)

How to Reduce High Blood Pressure

Healthy Salad
Image Source: Anna Pelzer/Unsplash

High blood pressure is when your blood pressure, the force of blood flowing through your blood vessels, is consistently too high.1 People with high blood pressure typically exhibit no symptoms. If the condition is left untreated, the damage left on your circulatory system can significantly impact your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other heart threats. While there are risk factors you can’t control, there are many steps you can take to help prevent and manage high blood pressure.

Eat a Well-Balanced Diet2

A well-balanced diet is an essential tool in managing your blood pressure. It’s important to limit your sodium intake along with saturated/trans fats, red meat and sweets. It’s also important to limit your alcohol intake. With a healthy diet of fruits, veggies and whole grains, you can reduce your blood pressure and maintain a healthy weight. Click here to find a list of healthy, high blood pressure friendly recipes.

Get Moving

Physical activity has a lot of positive health benefits. Not only will it help manage your high blood pressure, but it will also help strengthen your heart and assist in maintaining a healthy weight. If you want to start exercising, there’s no need to immediately begin running marathons. Start out where you’re comfortable, any amount of exercise is better than none. Try mixing it up by taking different classes, this will help you stay interested and build the habit.

Take your Medications Properly

Lifestyle changes are not the only solutions to high blood pressure, there are many medication options that can assist you in improving your health. It’s very important to follow your doctor’s recommendations and taking your medications as prescribed.

Have any Medication Questions?

Reach out to the Tria Health Help Desk: 1.888.799.8742

 

Sources:

  1. https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/high-blood-pressure/the-facts-about-high-blood-pressure
  2. https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/high-blood-pressure/changes-you-can-make-to-manage-high-blood-pressure/managing-blood-pressure-with-a-heart-healthy-diet

Why Did the Screening Age for Colon Cancer Change?

Person sitting in doctors office while doctor is taking notes
Image Source: vadimguzhva/iStock.com

The American Cancer Society has recently lowered its guidelines regarding colon cancer screening. It is now recommended that people should start getting screened at age 45 instead of at 50. Research has showed that people are getting colon cancer at younger and younger ages within the U.S. While there is no direct cause associated with this increase, the trend is clear enough to warrant a shift in the age guidelines.

1 Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer

According to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the U.S. There are an estimated 97,220 new cases of colon cancer in 2018. Overall, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is: about 1 in 22 (4.49%) for men and 1 in 24 (4.15%) for women.

Lower your risk of colon cancer

Unfortunately, you cannot prevent colon cancer. You can, however, take steps to lower your risk.

Here are a few tips to help lower your risk:

  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Exercise regularly
  • Have a diet high in vegetables, fruits and wholegrains
  • Avoid excess alcohol
  • Stop smoking
  • Most importantly, get tested if you’re age 45+

What are symptoms of colon cancer?

  • Bleeding from the rectum
  • Blood in the stool
  • Abdominal cramping
  • A change in the shape of the stool, diarrhea, constipation
  • A change in bowel habits, or the feeling you need to make a bowl movement but there is none

If you notice any symptoms, go to your doctor for a checkup.

 

If you have any additional questions regarding your medications,

reach out to the Tria Health Help Desk: 1.888.799.8742

 

Source: https://www.cancer.org/cancer/colon-rectal-cancer/about/key-statistics.html